What Is a Bullet Journal®?


Being organized can be an arduous task if you do not have the proper tools, and a new organizational approach seeks to be the be-all-end-all tool for those craving more order in their lives. Enter the Bullet Journal®.It would not be unreasonable to assume that being more organized is something that a great many people considered as an area for improvement when mulling over their New Year’s resolutions. Being organized can be an arduous task if you do not have the proper tools, and a new organizational approach seeks to be the be-all-end-all tool for those craving more order in their lives. Enter the Bullet Journal®.

What is a Bullet Journal?

The concept of the Bullet Journal was developed by digital product designer Ryder Carroll, who fine-tuned the system over a number of different iterations. The end result is an analog organization system that can be used to “track the past, organize the present and plan for the future.”

Per BulletJournal.com’s description, “The Bullet Journal is a customizable and forgiving organization system. It can be your to-do list, sketchbook, notebook and diary, but most likely, it will be all of the above. It will teach you to do more with less.”

How to Put it All Together

The Bullet Journal can be put together in a lined or grid notebook or journal, or it can be compiled in a specially-catered Bullet Journal, which can be purchased at https://store.bulletjournal.com when in-stock.

An effective Bullet Journal consists of four main components: an Index, Future Log, Monthly Log and Daily Log. All sections should be titled and numbered accordingly.

In the Index, you will log the page numbers corresponding with your Future Log, Monthly Logs and Daily Logs. This will be your reference point for quick access.

For a six-month Future Log, you will divide the number of lines across a two-page spread by three and draw three lines to create six sections corresponding with months. Number these pages and add them into your Index.

From here, you will turn to your next two-page spread and create a Monthly Log, starting by labeling both pages at the top with the name of the month. On the left-hand page, you will create two columns side-by-side, using a number to indicate the date and a letter to indicate the day of the week on which it falls. On the right-hand page, you will list out the tasks that you hope to accomplish during the month in a bulleted list. Number the pages and add them into your index.

Over your next spread, you will build the Daily Log. Add the day’s date in the upper left-hand corner of a section. Beneath it, you will write out short sentences to indicate tasks, events and notes for that day; these three entries will be denoted by dot bullets, circle bullets and dash bullets, respectively. Important tasks should be given the additional signifier of a star to the left of the bullet. Through this method, known as Rapid Logging, you should be able to log at least a full week—if not more—over a two-page spread. Whenever a task or event is completed or a note has been addressed, “X” out the bullet.

When setting up the Monthly Log for the following month, you will go over the previous month’s Daily Log to see which tasks remain outstanding. Any tasks that are not important can be lined out; outstanding tasks of immediate importance can be marked with a right arrow and copied into the new month’s log; and tasks that can be put off longer can be marked with a left arrow and migrated into the future log for later consideration.

Finally, if a number of tasks lead up to a certain goal or project, they can be gathered together in a collection on another spread of blank pages and indexed for later reference.

If you are having trouble staying on top of tasks, consider this unique and interesting approach as a means to curb your organizational issues. For more information on the system and how it works, visit http://bulletjournal.com.

 

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